South African batsman Jean Paul Duminy has said that his team is working really hard to get as much familiar as they can with the tricky pink ball challenges ahead of their day night test in Adelaide. They are specially practicing at the dawn time when it is the most difficult to track the ball while batting.

Picture Source: Getty
Picture Source: Getty

Ball sighting becomes harder when artificial lights comes into play. “It’s definitely a difference that you see, but I can’t give you the scientific reason why that is. We’ve still got to work that out. You’ve just got to fight through that phase. It’s obviously new to us, pink-ball cricket and day-night Test cricket. We’ve got to get used to it. And that’s why we wanted to bat as much as possible in that period during the warm-up game,” he thinks.

South Africa are new to this day night test concept but they surely hold some major aces in their hands courtesy their fast bowling line up which is considerably strong and high on confidence after their recent efforts against mighty Aussies. Likes of Vernon Philander, Kyle Abbott and deadliest Kagiso Rabada are waiting to use this pink ball to their own advantage.

Picture Source: Getty
Picture Source: Getty

“In certain positions, it becomes a little more challenging. It’s all about preparation; how much time you can spend in that light, catching balls, fielding. If you think about any sort of sport – if you think about a golfer, for example, he needs to be on the practise range to get better. That’s the sort of approach we are taking,” southpaw Duminy added about this pink ball challenges during dawn time.

Yes, South Africans have won the series already and they are little bit of concerned about this newest pink ball experience which lies upon them but the hunger to win the game like they won the other two is the same. It hasn’t changed at all. They will play with same intensity regardless of the new and challenging conditions.